The Arts Society  Teme Valley

Welcome to The Arts Society Teme Valley. We draw our members from across the community and are dedicated to promoting the appreciation and enjoyment of the Arts. We look at the history and contribution to our heritage of all forms of the Arts in their many guises including painting, sculpture, design, theatre, music and architecture.

We are proud of our series of well-supported lectures given by renowned experts on a wide variety of interesting subjects.  They are held on the 3rd Wednesday each month from September to May in the Ludlow Assembly Rooms.  See Lectures for more information.  We also organize Study Days, and Visits. Other events will be advertised from time to time.

Come and join us on a Wednesday afternoon from two o’clock at the Ludlow Assembly Rooms to find out more and enjoy listening to a talk about something you had never realized was so fascinating.

To find out how to join us or become a member and find out more about us, please click on Join Us  and the other tabs above.   We are a member of The Arts Society and are part of The Arts Society West Mercia area.

NOTICE

Owing to renovation works currently being carried out by the Ludlow Assembly Rooms (LAR), from now until further notice, Lectures will take place in Oscars, NOT in the auditorium. The coffee and tea sessions after the Lectures will be held in the Studio. LAR will provide signage to enable visitors to find Oscars as the usual entrance will be closed. Should the improvement works at LAR ever preclude the use of Oscars, details of an alternative venue will be published here.

NEXT LECTURE

18th MARCH 2020

THE EMPTY CHAIR FROM VAN GOGH TO AI WEI WEI

ANGELA FINDLAY

 

We all use chairs! But over the past 150 years, artists across the world have been using the humble chair as a conduit for profound ideas on themes from protest, absence and memory to domestic or everyday life.

In Europe, Egon Schiele, René Matisse, Gerhard Richter, Joseph Beuys used empty chairs for personal expression, while in America, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman used chairs to develop the exciting new artistic movements arising in the sixties.

The Palestinian artist, Mona Hatoum, adapted chairs to explore female identity and the Columbian artist, Doris Salcedo, stacked 1,550 between two buildings to remember anonymous victims of war.

These are just some of the many diverse artists and uses of chairs we will be looking at in this talk. And as in all my lectures, my personal connection as an artist, who has worked with chairs throughout her career, will aim to bring the subject to life.

Angela Findlay is a professional artist, writer and freelance lecturer with a long career of teaching art in prisons in Germany and England. Her time ‘behind bars’ gave her many insights into the huge impact the arts can have on processing guilt. In the past decade, Angela’s Anglo-German roots led her to research Germany’s little known post-WWII culture of remembrance and apology in which the arts, once again, play a huge and vital role.

Angela has a BA(Hons) in Fine Art, a Diploma in Artistic Therapy and her paintings - often of empty chairs - have been widely exhibited.

                             

Further details of each Lecture will be shown on the Lectures page as soon as they become available

Visitors welcome, pay £8 at the door

Reviews

You can read a review of some Lectures after they have been given by navigating to "Previous Lectures" on the Lectures Page. Click on the particular Lecture in which you are interested and, if it exists, the Review will be found beneath the Description of the Lecture. To read reviews of some of the  Study Days or Visits, follow the same principle as above but navigate first to the relevant page ie "Study Days" or "Visits" and then proceed as above.

Should you wish to make your own comment on any Lecture, Study Day or Visit for posting on this web site, please download the Comments Form from the Documents tab and once completed, email it to the Webmaster : gneden@googlemail.com. The Society reserves the right to edit any such comments.